Image of a researcher in a grass field 

Past Workshops 

Introduction to Spatial Data Analysis in R by Ross Dwyer and Chris Brown

This course was held on 1 February and due to popular demand, another session has been scheduled.

This course will demonstrate the ability of R to load, manipulate, combine and export spatial objects such as point features, line features, polygons and rasters in the R Programming Language. This course is directed at users with previous experience of analysing data in R and/or users familiar with GIS who would like to know more about the capacity of R to analyse their own spatial data.

Using R can really speed up your efficiency when working with spatial data and it will also centralize the data handling, plotting and statistical analysis aspects of your study. Best thing of all, R is free!

In this 1-day workshop, users will be introduced to the structure of spatial classes in R and I will demonstrate the ability of R to conduct standard GIS operations and visualise the results. While I have a rough plan of the tools I aim to cover in this workshop (e.g. transformation of coordinate reference systems, extraction, overlays, spatial joins and random sampling), the content is open for discussion and the complexity will depend on the experience of the attendees.

Pre-workshop homework: Install spatial packages, R basics script, Introductory Notes, FishLengths

 

Introduction to Integral Projection Models by Roberto Salguero-Gomez and Yvonne Buckley 

This workshop was held on 20 May. If you attended and would like to provide feedback, or if this is a course you would like to see offered again, please send us an email.

Population modelling provides insights on ecological and evolutionary processes as diverse as the probability of a local extinction, the evolution of cellular maintenance, or the influence of clonal propagation on senescence. Biologists have long worked with a variety of tools that model patterns of change in populations and explore the underlying causes of these dynamics. In recent decades, structured population model have served as an important link between these theoretical pursuits and applied analyses of observational and experimental data on populations. With advances in computing power and theoretical developments, population models have evolved rapidly and new approaches such as Integral Projection Models (IPMs) have emerged. IPMs are the next generation of stage-classified demographic models by offering all of the advantages of discrete matrix models in a more general framework. In the simplest form of an IPM, individuals of a population are classified along a continuous state variable (e.g., volume, height, weight), and the vital rates involved in the life cycle of the species (e.g., survival, growth, reproduction, and clonality) are modeled through a series of simple, biologically intuitive regressions. More complex IPMs can include age × size × habitat interactions, stochastic modeling, and coupling of genetic information on population dynamics.

This course will teach basic and some advanced applications of IPMs. By the end of the workshop, attendees will be able to construct IPMs with their own data, and estimate a number of important population rates, including: passage time, age-specific survival, age-specific reproductive curves, deterministic and stochastic population growth rates, sensitivities, and elasticities. 

 

Grass Identification by John Thompson and Rod Fensham 

This workshop was held on 5 February. If you attended and would like to provide feedback, or if this is a course you would like to see offered again, please send us an email.   

This workshop is designed for people with no understanding of grasses and their identification. We will start with, what is a grass and why are they different from other grass-like plants. We will also demonstrate the anatomy of grasses and their fertile parts. By the end of the day you should be familiar with some of the major grass genera around Brisbane and have the confidence to identify grasses using an interactive key. We will have fresh material of a range of grasses from the field and use the lab facilities at UQ to become acquainted with them.

 

If you would like to offer suggestions for future workshops, or offer to present a workshop, please visit our Suggestions Page.

Ecology Centre Workshop Suggestions
The Ecology Centre will sponsor a series of half to full day workshops on specialised skills of use to a wide range of ecologists seeking or having achieved a research higher degree. Topics of work...

Ecology Centre Workshop Suggestions

The Ecology Centre will sponsor a series of half to full day workshops on specialised skills of use to a wide range of ecologists seeking or having achieved a research higher degree. Topics of workshops will include but are not limited to genomic tools for ecological applications, specialised statistical techniques, use of key statistical software, advanced GIS skills and analyses, use of specialised equipment and plant identification. These workshops will be taught by members of the Ecology Centre or non-members brought in to provide expertise not currently available from Centre members.

The workshops will be posted here with sign-up instructions. If you have topics you would like to see presented, or you have skills that you think would be of interest to our members and thus are worthy of a workshop, please email ecology@uq.edu.au with details of your idea and following the guidelines detailed below.

When submitting workshop ideas please keep the following guidelines in mind: 

  • We will offer a wide range of courses so topics need not be restricted by any subfield of ecology or conservation biology. We also have the capacity to solicit instruction from outside of the Ecology Centre or UQ if there is support for a specific workshop idea. For this reason proposed topics need not be restricted to skills or know-how currently held by members of the Ecology Centre, though they should be ideas that will interest Ecology Centre members

  • Topics should be sufficiently restricted that they can be well covered in less than 7 hours

  • The audience of workshops will be Honours, Masters, PhD students, postdocs, research staff and academics

  • Workshops will be free to all students/staff and academics associated with the Ecology Centre

  • Funding is available to compensate non-academic workshop instructors for their teaching time, with the idea that workshops will primarily be taught by senior PhD students, postdocs, research staff or outside consultants

  • A minimum of 10 interested participants is required for a workshop to be scheduled, though you do not need to identify these participants as part of proposals

  • Depending on demand, the Ecology Centre will not necessarily support all proposed workshop ideas but we will aim to support as many as we can within reason